Elements Village

How to use the forums


Go Back   Elements Village > Editing and Organizing Discussions > Photoshop Elements Editor

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 17th, 2007, 05:25 PM
bama--gal's Avatar
bama--gal bama--gal is offline
Casual Forum User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central Alabama
Posts: 229
Images: 20
do you shoot raw?

I have a Nikon D70, but have never shot in raw. Just wondering what you shoot in and what is the advantage of shooting in raw. I know you have more control over the image but is it really that much better or ..... should you use it for all the creative images you shoot, but keep shooting in jpeg for all the like, family outings and just quick grab shots.

I can already see this will be a daily hangout for me woo-hoo!

Glenda
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old September 17th, 2007, 05:34 PM
kimh's Avatar
kimh kimh is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: NE florida
Posts: 2,070
Glenda, welcome to the forum.
I just started shooting in 'raw' and have the same questions as you. I guess raw gives more control of shadows, highlights etc. I saw a book on raw 'work flow' while I was out today but had already bought 2 books.
Someone will be along shortly to answer your questions I'm sure
Kimh
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Kimh
Im not crazy, I'm just a little unwell
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old September 17th, 2007, 06:36 PM
baycruisers's Avatar
baycruisers baycruisers is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 1,478
I just started shooting RAW. You do have a lot more control and since your changes to the RAW file are non-destructive there's little risk involved. There's a lot of power in ACR 4.1.
__________________
Mario
LR4/PSE11/Nikon Capture NX2/D7000
"Every picture tells a story, don't it?"--Rod Stewart

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old September 17th, 2007, 07:37 PM
jo's Avatar
jo jo is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 2,149
Images: 42
I've been shooting raw for a few months now, but with my XT I use raw+jpg. I can't quite give up on jpg although I really like the raw and those are the images I process.

However...

For shooting in bursts (especially small children doing what small children do) I set it to jpg because I can capture more quick shots all at once. Raw slows down the save.
__________________
jo
Photoshop Elements 9, Photoshop CS6, Lightroom 5.2
HP Touchsmart PC, Windows 7
Canon Pro9000 printer; Epson Perfection 2580 Photo scanner
Canon Digital Rebel XSi, 75-300mm IS lens, 28-135mm IS lens, 60mm macro lens, a set of extender rings, AND a 70-200 L lens
Nikon Coolpix P100
and an iphone that I'm learning to use
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old September 17th, 2007, 07:37 PM
dj_paige's Avatar
dj_paige dj_paige is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 3,544
Here is a long thread, and I jumped in somewhere in the middle, but I did quite a bit of experimentation and decided to keep shooting JPG instead of RAW.

I believe that Adobe Photoshop Elements 5.0 + Adobe Camera Raw 4.1 (now 4.2) is somewhat limited in what it can do with RAW files, and that if I had more powerful software, I might consider switching to RAW. Some of the limitations in PSE5 and ACR4.1: no cropping; inability to display grain reduction (in other words, ACR 4.1 has a function to reduce the grain, but the PSE5 organizer cannot display this reduced grain -- it displays the grainy photo, and when PSE5 prints such a photo, it prints it with the grain, it cannot print the reduced grain RAW photo); limited color control ability (you can't simultaneously increase green and red).

Now, some people have told me I can shoot RAW, then switch to JPG or PSD formats to do additional editing that cannot be done on the RAW photo. While this is certainly true, I felt that I didn't want a solution that forced me to switch formats in the middle of a workflow to obtain the desired results. It is just one more complication that I didn't want, one more step in the process that I didn't need, and not being a professional photographer, my conclusion was that JPG was good enough for me 99% of the time.
__________________
Paige
"It's nothing until I call it" -- Bill Klem, NL Umpire and native Rochesterian
My
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Photos
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old September 18th, 2007, 01:26 AM
jmikelewis jmikelewis is offline
Casual Forum User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Apache Junction, Arizona
Posts: 54
I have been shooting almost exclusively RAW for a few months now. Try it and you will like it seems to be the expression. Actually it has advantages but one of the big disadvatages is that it takes a lot more of your time editing each and every shot you take. If you are like me, retired and have the time and want all the detail you can get in a shot it is definetly worth it.
You are shooting with a Nikon, so there may be a little bit of a noise issue that it won't edit out. From what I have gathered so far and if I am correct a technical issue with the manufacturers causes Nikon noise issues and Canon sharpness issues. I am using a Canon D-30 and normally seek more sharpness for my images.

Give it a try, your camera like mine, may be able to shoot Jpg and RAW at the same time, makes for easy comparison.
Mike
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old September 18th, 2007, 01:43 AM
genevh's Avatar
genevh genevh is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 1,426
Send a message via Yahoo to genevh
I shoot with a Nikon D70s and shoot probably 99% of my pictures in RAW. However, I am using LR to complete my basic processing, and then use PSE5 to finish them off. LR gives me full control of my RAW files. ACR within PSE5 only allows limited control, but is still pretty powerful overall.

As I mentioned in the thread linked by Paige, the reason I shoot RAW is that it also forces me to pay more attention to how I take my photographs since RAW does not do any of the processing in-camera that taking a JPG shot does. The better I can get the shot correct shooting RAW, the better results I get when I am finished processing the file and outputting my JPG or PSD files. And I like having that control over my files that RAW gives me that JPG doesn't. (Yeah, there are times I can be a control freak! )

It is true that PSE5 with ACR does not give you all the options for processing your RAW files that LR and CS3 do, but it will allow you to get a lot of the basic stuff done before moving into PSE. I think ACR is integrated into CS3 more like it is LR so you should have full access to all the RAW tools there. But even then, and this depends on what you want to do with your work, ACR with PSE still allows you to complete a lot before you have to move over.

If you want complete control of your RAW processing but don't want to spend the money on CS3 yet, take a look at LR. It will allow you to fully process a photo in every way you want to with the exception of the artistic stuff. LR was not designed for that, whereas PSE and CS were.

Hope this helps.
__________________
Gene


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


CS5/LR4/Win7/Nikon!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old September 18th, 2007, 05:14 AM
Codebreaker's Avatar
Codebreaker Codebreaker is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Isle of Skye
Posts: 3,597
Images: 6
The most fundamental difference of RAW v JPEG is where the processing gets done.

JPEG images start out as RAW and are then processed in camera. This means you leave all the decisions about how this is done to the guys who designed camera.

With RAW you have to process the image using a suitable program. This involves time spent in front of the computer and in my opinion if you are taking a lot of RAW images then using Elements for this is going to be tedious and could quite easily turn you off. It also lacks several degrees of control that you'll find in other programs.

A program like Adobe Photoshop Lightroom is far more efficient at processing RAW images. There are others like Bibble and Phase one.

Personally, I've never seen the point in shooting RAW+JPEG. The two images will be processed differently and its not that hard to batch convert all your processed RAW files to JPEGs anyway.

Colin
__________________
Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints
__________________________________________________


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Went on another shoot yesterday bama--gal Pixel Hangout 8 September 26th, 2007 11:35 AM
Please HELP ME! or shoot me! Sergio Photoshop Elements Editor 31 September 7th, 2007 12:57 PM
How Would You Shoot This Exterior? henrfy1 Photoshop Elements Editor 16 January 20th, 2007 08:55 PM
Shoot me for asking, but . . . . MarieBoyer Photoshop Elements Editor 7 December 28th, 2006 06:45 AM
Balloon Shoot kevq Show Your Work 10 August 24th, 2006 11:58 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2010, Photo One Media Inc.