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  #1  
Old September 8th, 2007, 08:43 PM
fiver49 fiver49 is offline
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Cool camera raw question

Good day... I shoot exclusively in RAW on my Nikon D40. Can someone tell me just what exactly the purpose of the "recovery" slider is in the Camera Raw 4.1 plugin? And how I can use it to my benefit?

Thanks!
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Old September 8th, 2007, 08:59 PM
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Chuck S. Chuck S. is offline
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fiver:

The recovery slider will bring back highlights (the lightest tones) that may have disappeared from view in a moderate over-exposure. It's not magic, so if the image is really 'blown out' (highlights driven to pure white in camera), it won't do much. Suggestion: open an image in ACR 4.1, zoom in to 100%, and push the slider to the right while watching a very light area of the image.
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Old September 9th, 2007, 12:49 AM
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genevh genevh is offline
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In addition to what Chuck has said, it can also be used in conjunction with the exposure slider, especially on underexposed shots. One trick is to hold the ALT button down while using the Exposure and the Recovery sliders. This will make the picture go black, and you will begin to see white areas appear as you push up the exposure in an underexposed photo. These white areas will be your blown out areas. To try to get rid of them, slide the recovery slider to the right while still holding down the ALT button. When the white areas disappear, you supposedly have recovered the highlights.

This isn't an exact science, and how you set your exposure and recover your highlights can be a matter of personal choice and creativity.

Holding down the ALT key while adjusting the blacks slider turns the image white, and then as you slide the blacks slider over to the right, the black parts of the image will start to show up as, you guessed it - black!

Again, how far you go with it is a matter of your preferences and creativity in a particular shot. Holding down the ALT key (not sure what the corresponding key is on a MAC) while you make your adjustments will give you an idea of when your going too far based on the histogram. That's not to say going too far is a bad thing. This depends on the photo and what you're trying to achieve with it. The ALT key doesn't do anything when you're adjusting the fill flash slider, though.
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Old September 9th, 2007, 05:58 AM
JulieM JulieM is offline
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Fiver49: Welcome! I just wanted to say that your gallery is terrific. Beautiful images! Thanks for taking the time to caption them - I enjoy knowing the locations of everyone's pictures. I look forward to seeing more of your work...
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Old September 9th, 2007, 11:23 AM
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Byron Gale Byron Gale is offline
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On top of the guidance you've already received - you really owe it to yourself to watch Matt K.'s two videos "The New Camera Raw 101" and "...102" in the Subscriber's area.

I found it very helpful to see the controls in action as Matt worked with the RAW editor.
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Old September 9th, 2007, 11:35 AM
NickLewis NickLewis is offline
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My way of looking at what's happening with the Recovery slider is that you are turning down the exposure on the highlights, without affecting the overall exposure less bright parts of the scene. You would want to do that if you'd increased the ACR Exposure setting, perhaps to capture shadow detail, which had resulted in your highlights blowing out.

But as Chuck says, this can't recover highlights that have blown in camera. There's no detail in them for PSE to work with. It only helps recover highlights that have blown because of settings within ACR.

Nick
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Old September 9th, 2007, 10:59 PM
SilverFox SilverFox is offline
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Chuck,
I can see that everyone is familiar with using a forum. I, on the other hand, am older, have a keen interest in doing what all of you are doing, but I don't have a clue where to start. My dilemma? I have 8 very large boxes of photos that need to be scanned (eventually restored and printed) and have very little time in which to complete the task. By reading some of the posts here I can see that I have too much to do to learn PSE or other program right now. I also see that I can do the scanning immediately and do the rest whenever I can. My questions: Since I want the most detail out of every photo I scan (for future use in printing) and since I want to be able to enlarge the photos later, especially those that are only 2" by 2", and since most are from the late 1890s up to the 1950s, should I scan them at the highest resolution? Or, should I just take digital photos of them set to "raw" or what? (As you can see, I am not even sure how to pose the questions!) Thank you for your help. I intend to start tomorrow with the scanning or the digitizing of the old photos, many of which are B&W.
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Old September 10th, 2007, 03:28 AM
NickLewis NickLewis is offline
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Hi, silverfox, and welcome to the forum.

Don't worry about not knowing how to use the forum. Somebody here'll jump in and help -it's a very friendly place. Chuck'll probably be on a bit later, once the planet has turned a bit more......

My feeling is that you're almost certainly better off scanning the photos. Reshooting them will get you into a whole set of problems about lighting them evenly, achieving critical focus and so on.

High resolution will be better than low. When you finally print up, you need about 300 pixels per inch for true photographic quality. But bear in mind that scanning at a high resolution can't put detail into the scan that isn't in the print to start with. You probably won't be able to blow 2"x2" prints up to very large sizes without them looking fuzzy, simply because the detail is just not there.

What scanner are you planning to use?

Nick
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Old September 10th, 2007, 06:18 AM
JulieM JulieM is offline
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Silverfox: Welcome to the forum! I, too, am launching a project to scan a family archive of images. Mine are 35mm color slides and I may have as many as 6000 of them! Nick and others will be a great resource for you in this process...
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Old September 11th, 2007, 11:46 PM
SilverFox SilverFox is offline
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Scanning Old Photos for Restoration

Thank you Nick and Julie! I can already see that this forum will be my best help yet to help me digitize and restore very old photos of my family's ancestors as well as a future task of trying to learn how to digitize our slides, 8mm videos, VHS videos, etc.

I started to organize this morning. I collected everything I needed but when I connected my CanoScan LIDE80 scanner, it did not power up. I went online and read as much as I could about it. Everything points to the fact that it just quit on me and now I'll need to buy another. I'm researching for another scanner tonight. Any suggestions? I will need to be able to scan old glass negatives, as well as other old negatives, etc. I will also need to be able to get great scans of text as I am going to add photos to a history my Mother wrote that starts back in the late 1800s. She is 95 and lives with us now. She will help me make sure I get the right names on the photos.... She is very interested in this project.
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