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  #31  
Old October 9th, 2011, 11:05 AM
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Codebreaker Codebreaker is offline
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While Franks, suggestion is good and will give you some confidence, you need to keep in mind a few things.

1. If you have 20/20 vision then your visual acuity will only allow you to resolve about 300PPI on a printed image at approx. reading distance.

2. The average printer cant resolve any more detail than approx. 300PPI

3. The resolution of the average screen is approx. 96PPI.

All this goes back to what we said originally. If you just want a 1:1 copy then 300PPI is sufficient. If you want to enlarge then you need to increase the scanning resolution.

Just FYI - I read a long while back that taking into account the silver halide granules on some film, this was equivalent to approx 4000PPI. This resolution is needed on film since the prints or projections are considerably larger. When enlarged the resolution goes down.

Colin
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  #32  
Old October 9th, 2011, 06:09 PM
Fifer05 Fifer05 is offline
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Originally Posted by Codebreaker View Post
While Franks, suggestion is good and will give you some confidence, you need to keep in mind a few things.

1. If you have 20/20 vision then your visual acuity will only allow you to resolve about 300PPI on a printed image at approx. reading distance.

2. The average printer cant resolve any more detail than approx. 300PPI

3. The resolution of the average screen is approx. 96PPI.

All this goes back to what we said originally. If you just want a 1:1 copy then 300PPI is sufficient. If you want to enlarge then you need to increase the scanning resolution.

Just FYI - I read a long while back that taking into account the silver halide granules on some film, this was equivalent to approx 4000PPI. This resolution is needed on film since the prints or projections are considerably larger. When enlarged the resolution goes down.

Colin
I dont care what printers today can handle since im scaning these to keep for years and can wait for printter tech to get better, plus i might want to just zoom in on a face or a object. So if i scan a photo at 4000DPI and zoom way in on a object in the background to the point where its pixelated i wont get a clearer look at above 4000dpi right?
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  #33  
Old October 10th, 2011, 05:11 AM
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My figure of 4000dpi is unqualified - its based upon something I read many years ago. But even if this was correct and you wanted to be able to scan each grain of the film you'd need to scan at 3 times this rate.

Basically since you don't know the resolution of the films/prints you have and don't know what you may want to do with them, I guess you're answering your own question in a way - Scan at the maximum resolution your scanner supports.

Colin
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  #34  
Old October 10th, 2011, 06:51 AM
frank abramonte frank abramonte is offline
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I dont care what printers today can handle since im scaning these to keep for years and can wait for printter tech to get better, plus i might want to just zoom in on a face or a object. So if i scan a photo at 4000DPI and zoom way in on a object in the background to the point where its pixelated i wont get a clearer look at above 4000dpi right?
Just scanning at the highest resolution will not necessarily give you the detail you expect on an extreme zoom in. As Colin points out the detail in the original photo may just not be good enough to support a super enlargement. At a point the increase in resolution is counter productive.
You should also test to see whether it's better for you to make the corrections in PSE or have the scanner software make them. Most times I find making my own corrections are superior to the corrections made by the scanner software.
Post back with your progress.
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  #35  
Old October 10th, 2011, 06:03 PM
Fifer05 Fifer05 is offline
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I will do some tests in the few days and post back with my results
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