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donn_iam
December 16th, 2009, 12:17 AM
Hi All, I would like to make a high quality, and if possible an HD quality, slide show--putting it together in PSE7 and then finishing and outputing it to a DVD in PS7. My original 200 photos were taken on a 10 megapixel camera in the highest quality (least compression) setting so the file sizes are about 4 megabytes on average. I read the (wonderful) thread posted in February about making a 16:9 1080i slide show, and was going to follow that generally, but I gather the moderator had misgivings about adjusting the final dimensions after importing to PE. Does someone have a recommended workflow, and should I compress the photos in the PSE editor or leave them at full size, in addition to cropping resizing?
Thanks
Don

ATR
December 16th, 2009, 07:41 AM
Don

Could you post the link to which you were referring
I read the (wonderful) thread posted in February about making a 16:9 1080i slide showAlso could you describe your system resources
operating system
installed and available RAM
free hard drive space
external hard drive (format and capacity)

In addition, do I understand you correctly that you want to burn this "1080i" slideshow to DVD in Premiere Elements 7? If so, remember that burn to disc (Share/Disc/Disc DVD) offers DVD-VIDEO standard or widescreen (both with the frame size of 720 x 480, the widescreen including a 16:9 flag). Are you thinking Share/Disc/Disc BluRay...does not sound like it?

ATR

donn_iam
December 16th, 2009, 01:21 PM
Don

Could you post the link to which you were referring
Also could you describe your system resources
operating system
installed and available RAM
free hard drive space
external hard drive (format and capacity)

In addition, do I understand you correctly that you want to burn this "1080i" slideshow to DVD in Premiere Elements 7? If so, remember that burn to disc (Share/Disc/Disc DVD) offers DVD-VIDEO standard or widescreen (both with the frame size of 720 x 480, the widescreen including a 16:9 flag). Are you thinking Share/Disc/Disc BluRay...does not sound like it?

ATR


Hi, Thanks for replying!
There are two earlier threads that I read that relate to hiqh quality slide shows:
http://www.elementsvillage.com/forums/showthread.php?t=44647
http://www.elementsvillage.com/forums/showthread.php?t=45875 and within that, particularly, the post by timoj

My PC runs Windows XP sp3 and is a Pentium D running at 2.8 gightz; there are 3 gb of RAM and two installed HDs, C: is 224 gigs with 116 free, and D:, my photo archive with 66 GB and virtually nothing free -- I will either or both clean it up or get an external drive (TB) for the holidays. What are you referring to when you ask about the format of the external drive; sector size? I am a long time PSE user and have made several slide shows, but just recently updated to PSE 7 and PE 7; I am very much new to PE.

I don't fully understand your last query--I don't have a blue-ray player, so was hoping to do a standard DVD--but how can 16:9 be recorded at 720x480 (1.78 and 1.5 aspect ratio)?

Don

ATR
December 16th, 2009, 02:33 PM
Don

I will revisit those threads that you referenced and expand upon them shortly, giving you a comprehensive overview of the matter. I believe they stand as written for the specific users and their specific situations.

For now, I will just excerpt two of many considerations:

a. With Premiere Elements, you can burn to disc (DVD) only DVD-VIDEO standard (4:3) or widescreen (16:9). BOTH have a frame size of 720 x 480 (frame pixel aspect ratio = 4:3) BUT the widescreen includes a 16:9 flag that stretches the display after encoding.

b. You have 2 major options for getting your Photoshop Elements SlideShow Editor to Premiere Elements (1) as wmv that needs to be written in Photoshop Elements with the appropriate file size (profile). There is no 1080i profile that comes with Photoshop Elements. You could create one in the utility, Windows Media Profile Editor, but why if you are only going to be exporting in Premiere Elements with the limitation of DVD-VIDEO widescreen 720 x 480? (2) the non wmv route where typically an integrated Photoshop Elements Premiere Elements gets you the perk of breaking the Photoshop Elements slideshow apart in Premiere Elements for further edits.

If you do not go the route where the resizing burden falls on the writing of the wmv in Photoshop Elements, then the burden falls to Premiere Elements and its resizing of 200 photos from a 10 MP camera to the standardized frame size of 720 x 480. This should follow the expected course of crashing the system unless you resize the photo beforehand to pixel dimensions not to exceed 1000 x 750 pixels which would seem to defeat your purposes of a “1080i” slideshow.

For your intended export choice DVD VIDEO widescreen, that is the short version. The transfer of pans & zooms et al from Photoshop Elements and Premiere Elements is another aspect of the same issue. I do not embrace some of the workflow generalizations suggested by others, but I will go into more detail on that later.


ATR

ATR
December 16th, 2009, 10:00 PM
Don

After revisiting the earlier two posts that you referenced on “HD slideshows”, I restate
I believe they stand as written for those specific users and their specific situations. Keep in mind that timoj edited his photos in Photoshop Elements Full Editor, and used Premiere Elements 1920 x 1080 project preset (template) to edit his photos in Premiere Elements and then exported a .wmv 720p (1280 x 720) version of it that he burned to DVD with a 3rd party software for playback on his BluRay player. Also, remember that he had about 100 photos with typical pixel dimensions of 1835 x 1223. You have about 200 with pixel dimensions of 3872 x 2592 and are heading for DVD-VIDEO (720 x 480). I have no idea of the comparison between his computer resources and yours.


On the other hand, Spunky64 was heading for DVD-VIDEO, in a time crunch, with a lot of photos with sizing issues already in an album in Photoshop Elements. My suggested plan of action for getting her a DVD-VIDEO slideshow was based on her particular situation and proved successful for her. All the rest is there in those threads which I hope that you have read from start to finish so that nothing is taken out of context due to timoj injecting comments in her thread that might have proven helpful under different circumstances.

There are several workflows that you could follow to accomplish your specific task, provided that you have the computer resources to support it.

The traditional…..Use Photoshop Elements 7 to resize your photos to pixel dimensions not to exceed 1000 x 750 pixels (Full Editor, File Menu/Process Multiple Files). Bring them into the Photoshop Elements 7 Slide Show Editor and create your slideshow there (pans & zooms, transitions, fit audio to slides, etc). Then use the Slide Show Editor Output option “Send to Premiere Elements” to do just that. Beforehand, have Premiere Elements 7 with a project preset (new project dialog) = NTSC DV Widescreen). Edit Menu/Preferences/General would have the “Default Scale to Frame Size” checked. Make sure that you render the Timeline in the Edit Mode by pressing the Enter Key of the computer main keyboard in order to get the best possible preview of the end product before you make judgments on overall quality and how well the pans and zooms and transitions transferred from Photoshop Elements 7 to Premiere Elements 7. The final judge of quality is the playback of the DVD-VIDEO on the TV via the TV/DVD player.Also involved would be Create Menus, followed by Share/Disc/Disc (DVD) with the NTSC Widescreen DVD preset. The recommended amount of time on the DVD is about 90 minutes in spite of the DVD spec 4.7 GB/120 minutes. The program automatically lowers the bitrate if it labors to fit content onto the DVD. Lower bitrate translates into lower quality. You can check the Space Required and Bitrate in the Premiere Elements burn dialog quality area immediately before burn (with DVD disc in the DVD burner tray).

You could also bring your resized photos into Premiere Elements 7 and create your slideshow there. Project preset (new project dialog) would be the same NTSC DV Widescreen. Edit Menu/Preferences/General would have “Default Scale to Frame Size” checked. You could do the pans and zooms with presets or by the recommended keyframing, import soundtrack, add narration, apply effects, add transitions, etc. Then as above, you would go to Create Menus, Share/Disc/Disc with the same considerations as above. With 200 photos with pixel dimensions of 3872 x 2592 with a destination of DVD Video this would seem the likely route to go.

But that does not prohibit you from attempting to go the photo prep route based on timoj’s strategy as I interpret it to be
(a) import photos into a Premiere Elements with project preset (new project dialog) = NTSC DV Widescreen, with Edit Menu/Preferences/General and “Default Scale to Frame Size” unchecked
(b) Properties Palette/Motion Panel with its properties of Scale and Position, resize and keyframe your pans and zooms, etc.

You might do a mini test run of each to see what gives you the best results, keeping in mind the difference in the desired end product that you seek and that which timoj sought. I have a similar slideshow that I need to get out, and I will probably go the 2nd route where I resize the photos and use Premiere Elements to create the slideshow as well as export it to DVD-VIDEO Widescreen. My photos are from a 8 MP camera. Similarly prepared slideshows have given me good results in the past.

Please let me know if any of this has helped or if you need to focus in on Premiere Elements keyframing, placing transitions, creating menus, and similar matters. Some are lured into first preparing the slideshow in Photoshop Element Slide Show Editor especially due to its pan and zoom feature (Premiere Elements needs presets or keyframing) and fit audio to slides (Premiere Elements, none) feature.


ATR

mark40
March 25th, 2010, 11:29 PM
i am using dvd photo slid show which very useful in
1- Very high image quality on TV, with a DVD player, the screen resolution of DVD slide show will be 704x576. Your photos will look great on TV.
2-Many pretty interactive menu template to choose from. It makes your DVD slide show outstanding and unique.
3-The original photo files can be save on the DVD slide show disc. It is a safe way to archive your photos and you can easily share your photo with your friends.
4-Supports most cd burners and home DVD player models. mark
microsoft mcse (http://www.mcseexams.com)
USA

ATR
March 26th, 2010, 09:23 AM
Mark40

What brings you to Elements Village Forums and March 26, 2010 posting at the end of a Premiere Elements December 2009 Thread? What versions of Photoshop Elements and/or Premiere Elements do you have and use?

Here in the Premiere Elements Forum our focus is on troubleshootings Premiere Elements, resolving issues within the program. Although your method of choice and opinions are interesting, the person who started this December 2009 thread had questions specific to the how to for Photoshop Elements 7 and Premiere Elements 7.

If you have any questions about the use of Premiere Elements (any version) please start a new thread of your own, and I will customize a response to your Premiere Elements video editing preferences.

ATR